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Theft, robbery and burglary in the state of Florida can have significant consequences for the individual who has been charged. Not only could you face incarceration, but also heavy fines, a criminal record and driver’s license suspension. In addition to criminal penalties, you can face job loss and a lack of educational opportunities.

Allegations can arise out of a mere accusation or accident. Florida law enforcement personnel and prosecutors will attempt to prosecute theft crimes to the fullest extent. You will need to approach your case with caution and speed by speaking with a Miami theft attorney at Beckham Solis, Attorneys at Law, as soon as possible.

Contact our team at 305-860-4884 today for a free review of your theft charges in Miami, Florida.

Types Of Theft Crimes We Handle

Generally described as unlawfully taking another’s property, theft crimes may include:

  • Burglary
  • Robbery
  • Petty theft
  • Grand theft
  • Shoplifting
  • Carjacking

Shoplifting as described in the Florida Statutes § 812.015 refers to the offense of taking merchandise from a store with the intention of depriving the owner of the full value of the item. Either a felony in the first or second degree can be charged depending on the property’s value for shoplifting.

Grand theft refers to the taking of another’s property that is valued at a price of $300 or more. Based on Florida Statutes § 812.014, the offender’s intent must have been to deprive the owner of his or her property.

Burglary Is Considered A Theft Crime

Burglary is “entry with intent to steal” regardless of whether or not the individual was successful in the theft of property or not, a charge of burglary will be filed. There are various issues surrounding a charge of burglary that can include trespassing, falsification of identity or breaking in. “Breaking in” indicates that a person gained access to the building – but does not necessarily mean that force was used.

Knowing The Different Degrees Can Help You Understand Your Charges

The penalties for burglary depend upon the degree of the offense committed:

First-Degree Burglary

Burglary in the first degree occurs when a defendant enters a dwelling, structure or conveyance and commits assault or battery on any victim, is armed with a dangerous weapon, or uses a motor vehicle to damage an occupied or unoccupied structure or dwelling during the commission of the offense. First-degree burglary is punishable by a maximum sentence of life in state prison.

Second-Degree Burglary

Burglary in the second degree occurs when a defendant enters an occupied structure or conveyance, or any type of dwelling, regardless of whether or not it is occupied. Second-degree burglary is punishable by a maximum sentence of 15 years in state prison.

Third-Degree Burglary

Burglary in the third degree occurs when a defendant enters an unoccupied structure or an unoccupied conveyance with the purpose of committing a crime therein. Third-degree burglary is punishable by a maximum sentence of five years in state prison.

Under Florida law, the theft crime of robbery is defined as taking money or other property from a person through the use of force, violence, assault or fear. Robbery also involves the intent to temporarily or permanently deprive the victim or the rightful owner of the money or property. This type of theft is always charged as a felony and carries heavy penalties, so defendants should retain the defense of an experienced lawyer as soon as possible.

Robbery Is Another Form Of A Theft Crime

Sentencing for conviction of robbery in the state of Florida will depend upon the factors involved in the incident:

Robbery With A Firearm Or Deadly Weapon

If the defendant carried a firearm or any type of deadly weapon during the commission of the crime, the robbery is charged as a first-degree felony. Robbery with a firearm or deadly weapon is punishable by up to life in prison.

Robbery With A Weapon

If the defendant carried a weapon during the commission of the crime, the robbery is charged as a first-degree felony. Robbery with a weapon is punishable by incarceration in state prison for a maximum of 30 years.

Simple Robbery

If the defendant did not carry any firearms or weapons during the commission of the crime, the robbery is charged as a second-degree felony. Simple robbery is punishable by incarceration in state prison for a maximum of 15 years.

Aggressive Advocacy For Your Case. Call Today.

Secure experienced and highly qualified representation from Beckham Solis, Attorneys at Law. We have more than 35-plus years of combined experience. Our lawyers know how to protect the freedoms of our clients. Available defense options can be evaluated during your free case evaluation, such as lack of specific intent, false pretenses or larceny by trick. Contact our Miami theft lawyers online or at 305-860-4884 today to discuss your charges and legal options